Accident prevention – health promotion resources

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Non-returnable resources, leaflets and posters are no longer available from this site.

If your role includes health promotion in East Sussex, you can find a range of high quality online, printable and hard copy health promotion resources, with live stock levels at Health Promotion Resources East Sussex

Loan items will continue to be displayed on these pages and the system will not be changing. Please continue to reserve in the usual way.

Health promotion leaflets and posters

Resources list

Library resources for loan - how to order

You need a special health promotion library card and PIN to reserve loans on our E-library (complete our registration form below). Once you have these, just click on the resources you’re interested in below, then click ‘Place reservation’. We’ll deliver them to the library where you’ve chosen to collect them.

Form – Health Promotion library card registration

Resources list

  • Accidents and child development
    Offers more than safety advice, it explores how a child’s physical, emotional and intellectual development are linked to the risk of them having a serious accident. (guide – Child Accident Prevention Trust, 2012)
  • Blue dog parent guide and CD
    Owning a dog has benefits for humans, including child development, but we must recognise potential hazards and try to minimise the risks of children and animals living together. (CD and booklet – Blue Dog Trust, 2007)
  • Drunkbuster impairment goggles
    Also known as beer goggles, drunk goggles or drunk glasses, these simulate the effects of being drunk including confusion, visual distortion, slowed reaction time and lack of coordination. (teaching aid – fpa, 2013)
  • Fancy a cuppa?
    Kit to help prevent hot drink scalds in babies and young children. Includes DVD, information cards and flyers. (DVD resource pack – Child Accident Prevention Trust)
  • Home is where the harm is
    Training pack to raise awareness of accidents in the home and how to reduce them, includes falls, DIY and garden, poisoning, scalds, fire, burns, carbon monoxide, choking and suffocation. (DVD – RoSPA)
  • Look who’s falling
    Scenarios about how young children can fall from windows, stairs and high chairs, with footage from a child’s eye view. Shows how easily accidents happen and how they can be prevented. (DVD pack – Child Accident Prevention Trust, 2013)
  • Medicine cabinet… or candy box?
    Created to look like a medicine cabinet, this 3D display opens to reveal ‘shelves’ with permanently sealed, lookalike medicines and sweets. (teaching model – Health Edco, 2006 and 2009)
  • Splat! the helmet safety game
    Shows kids why a helmet is needed when they cycle or skateboard. Put an egg inside two models of a person’s head – one protected by a helmet – and drop them on a mat to see how much difference protective gear makes. (game – Health Edco, 2011)
  • Target 4: teaching pack for people with learning disabilities
    Four health promotion games about heart disease, cancer, mental health and accident prevention, designed to meet the educational needs of people with learning disabilities. (game – Pavilion Publishing)
  • Teddy takes a tumble
    On their journey to Grandma’s, Billy forgets to belt his teddy in his safety seat. This informative story about what happens next is a must for teaching seatbelt safety. (storysack – Storysack Ltd)
  • Too hot to handle
    Looks at three scenarios, a scald from spilling a hot drink, a contact burn from an oven hob and a bath water scald from a child falling or climbing into a hot bath. (DVD pack – Child Accident Prevention Trust)
  • Toxic tales
    DVD for parents about the risks of accidental poisoning. Covers three of the most common and serious scenarios – medicine and pills, household cleaning products and carbon monoxide. (DVD – Child Accident Prevention Trust, 2011)
  • Preventing accidents
  • These flashcards are session plans for parents and carers groups, which can be broken down into the three key stages of development: Because I’m a growing baby, Now I’m a toddler, Now I’m getting bigger – young children under five. (Flashcards, Child Accident Prevention Trust, 2012)